This free 7 point marketing brief stops you making mistakes

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Billboard advertisement saying Life is better without crap ads
Actually I rather like this

“A tried-and-tested marketing brief to supercharge your communications”

When you have to produce marketing work, what do you use for help or inspiration?

Do you just fly straight into developing your creative idea, shaping your message along the way?

If you do, you’re in good company. That’s what most people do. Heaven knows I’ve done it 1000’s of times.

I’m not sure about you, but the reason for me rushing straight to developing the creative is simple: time. Or, to be more accurate, a lack of it.

You are probably busier now than you have ever been.

You have a dizzying number of marketing channels to write for, but sadly, the same hours in your day.

But don’t despair, this free 7 point brief could save you

And it doesn’t matter if you’re writing for social media, email or posted direct marketing, press, radio, TV advertising or even events and experience marketing – it works for them all.

It was developed by Steve Harrison, one of the most successful advertising men of the last 30 years.

Steve and his agency, Harrison Troughton Wunderman, produced advertising for some of the biggest brands in the world, including Vodaphone, The AA, IBM and Microsoft.

If you’ve not heard of him, he’s one of the most successful creatives the UK has ever produced; winning the inaugural ‘Cannes Lion Direct Grand Prix’ award. On top of this, he has won three gold, five silver and two bronze Lions at the world’s biggest annual awards for professionals in creative communications.

I had the pleasure of watching Steve present recently at Drayton Bird’s European Academy of Direct and Interactive Marketing (EADIM) conference in London.

What a fantastic experience it was. And if you ever get the chance to see him – or any of Drayton’s events – I urge you to take it.

So, here is your free 7 point creative brief. I hope it helps you.

Use it. Maybe you’ll end up collecting a Lion or two of you own!

 

Carl

How to write your marketing brief

The simplest way of looking at a brief is like this: your client or prospect has a problem. You think you can solve it for them.

When you are writing your brief, keep this in mind as you answer the below questions. It helps maintain logic as you go; ensuring your argument builds irresistibly to your proposition.

1, Who are you talking to? 

Describe your prospect. Who are they? What do they do? How does your service fit into and affect their lives? Do they currently use your service or do they use a competitors offering? If neither, how are they coping without you?

2, What do they think before receiving your message?

This is your opportunity to describe the problem, the need, the want or the desire. This single insight or truth shapes the whole brief. Put simply, you might start by saying “My job is fine but I keep having to……..”. Or “I’d get the promotion I need if only I could…………”. Or “I’m working late every night because …….”. Or “I’d like to eat healthy food but……..”.

3, What do we want them to think after they have received your message?

This is where you will describe how your service will provide a solution to your prospects problem, their need, want or desire. Put simply, you could say “Great, now I can start to ……….”. Or At last I Can…”. Or “Now I no longer have to work late because…..”.

4, What do we want them to do once they have received or read your message?

Go to a website? Return an enquiry form? Call a helpline? Order a sample?

5, What is a proposition?

What is the single-minded promise that will solve your prospects problem? It must, in just one sentence, encapsulate what your product or service offers your prospects. Do not try to write your proposition as a clever headline. Just write it as clearly and as simply as possible.

6, What is the support for your proposition?

Why should the prospect believe your promise? Only give reasons that are relevant and persuasive. Quote facts. Quote figures. Maybe highlight your awards. Quote any tests you have conducted that show your strength against your competitor. Explain in detail how your product or service gives the benefit you have described in your proposition.

7, Other benefits that will persuade your prospects to buy from you

Describe all the advantages your prospects get by using your product. Keep asking yourself “What’s in it for them?”

PS. If you have not already got it, buy and read Steve Harrison’s book ‘How to Do Better Creative Work’. It is without doubt one of the most useful books I have ever read on marketing communications. 

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